Sport Sister Podcast - Season 2, Episode 1

Episode 1 – Raising Your Profile: Charlotte Richardson and Leigh Willis.

Raising Your Profile- Charlotte Richardson and Leigh Willis

Charlotte Richardson is an award-winning marketing and media professional, football commentator and presenter. Leigh Willis has been involved as a volunteer in grassroots football for 14 years.

Charlotte and Leigh join Natalie Doyle to discuss the importance of clubs raising their profile, and provide many hints and tips that you can action within your club.

“It’s why you try and get those foundations right by having a good website, by having accurate information, and a nice tone of voice to your digital channels. But there’s no good having all of that and if someone turns up to your football club, and they’re greeted with miserable, unhappy people.”

- Charlotte Richardson

Read this episode’s transcript

Natalie Doyle:

Welcome to the Sports Sister Podcast, where we bring together professional experts with grassroots pioneers to discuss key topics for grassroots sport.

I’m Natalie Doyle, and in this episode, I’m joined by two people with a lot of experience. Charlotte Richardson is an award-winning marketing and media professional, football commentator and presenter. Charlotte has worked in sport for 10 years for organizations including Women in Sport, The FA, BBC, and many more. Leigh Willis has been involved as a volunteer in grassroots football for 14 years, initially as a parent, and then into many other aspects of the game, including coach, manager, club and league committee member, FA representative and consultant.

They’ve covered lots of roles in sport between them and I know they’re going to have some great tips for us, so let’s go and meet them and see what they have to say.

Charlotte and Leigh, thank you so much for joining me today. We are going to talk about raising your profile, which could be for clubs or organizations or it could be for individuals. Before I start to pick your brains, would you mind just introducing yourself for the listeners, please? Who wants to go first?

Leigh Willis:

Yep, no problem. So I’m Leigh Willis. I’ve been in grassroots football now for about 15 years, predominantly the girl’s side of grassroots with my daughters playing and me as a parent and then progressing into a coach or being dragged in as a coach to be fair, one of the only parents standing on the sidelines and did that, and then onwards to be a manager, and then eventually getting involved in leagues and clubs and various committees and working with the FA and for the FA as a club consultant as my current roles at the moment.

Natalie Doyle:

Lots to keep you busy then Leigh. I think also if I’m right in thinking that you are one of the biggest clubs in the country in terms of the number of female teams, is that right?

Leigh Willis:

I believe so, yes. We were at one point the biggest, I think we’re still up there which is a great accolade and great for all those girls at our club that continue to play football and have progressed through the ages now onto our ladies’ teams.

Natalie Doyle:

Fantastic. Charlotte, do you want to introduce yourself?

Charlotte Richardson:

Yeah, well firstly, thank you for having me on the podcast. My name’s Charlotte Richardson. I’ve been working and volunteering in football for the past 10 years now. I’ve always had a real passion for the game and wanted to work within journalism in football. So whilst I was at university, I volunteered at Gillingham ladies as it was known at the time, looking after their media, their communications, marketing and so on. And at the time there was a lot of disparity between the coverage of women’s football compared to men’s football. So that voluntary experience was really eye-opening and led to me working for my local County FA, the Kent FA, as their marketing and communications officer. And from that point, over the last few years, I’ve had different marketing roles across football, across the football pyramid, most recently at Bromley Football Club, a really progressive club, competing at the National League, but with real aspirations for their women’s team, recreational women’s football, really aligned with my own values of what they want to do for women, both on and off the football pitch.

I’m now entering the world of freelance, so alongside marketing is the media experience, the sort of media side to me. And I broadcast in football for a number of organizations, I get to cover various games across the men’s and women’s and lightly I’m also an FA club consultant as well, so spend some time working with clubs that have visions to be futureproof, to enhance and be the best that they can be, which is what I really love doing. I love working with clubs alongside everything. So yeah, multiple hats. It keeps me busy lightly and yourself, Natalie, but absolutely love it and it’s never ever a dull day.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, great variety there. And a huge amount of experience between the two of you, which is obviously why I wanted you both to join me for this episode. As I said, we’re talking about raising profiles and sometimes this can be something that gets neglected by clubs or by individuals as well. Why do you think it’s so important that people think about their profile and how they can raise it either of themselves or of their club or organization?

Leigh Willis:

When we started with a girl’s section, I think we had three teams at the time, and you look around at some really big clubs around you and I think clubs just get a little bit complacent. I think they’ve got something in place they’re really pleased with and then it just sort of stops. And I don’t think you can ever be like that. I think you’ve got to be constantly growing, evolving, listening to what the community is feeding back, listening to what your members are feeding back and looking to progress further and introduce new things, try new things, upgrade facilities, and look at better working practices and how you can improve things for everyone.

I think standing still is an easy thing to do and we all do it. We all think, oh, brilliant, we’re there! We’ve done it! We’ve got to have a rest. It doesn’t work like that because there’s always something changing, The FA like to keep us on our toes with different things and stuff like that. Some things work amazingly. Other things you think, why do they bother? But you know, it’s good. It does keep your brain very much constantly on the go. Not that the Mrs is ever happy with that because I never put the laptop down, but I just think you’ve got to be realistic that you’re starting a project. You’ve got to see it all the way through and continue to see it through and necessarily you yourself, but have a good succession plan of individuals around you that are also on that same journey as well.

Charlotte Richardson:

Yeah, I think as Leigh alludes to there, whether you’re a volunteer or someone who’s paid to work in the game, there is so much to do on a day-to-day basis from administration to making sure the bills are paid, safeguarding, really, really vital things that are at the forefront of football, raising the profile, marketing and communications is often perhaps lower down on the priority list. And I’m biased because marketing has been my foray for the last 10 years as I spoke about. But for me, it has to be at the forefront as well. Because if you are not marketing yourself, if you’re not communicating, if you’re not telling your local community about what you are doing, then I feel like your other areas of growth are stunted. They’re only going to get so far. And that’s why I think it is really important that committees, that the volunteers, that football clubs do always bear in mind how they’re communicating.

Because when you do so effectively, it really enriches everything you are doing as a footballing organization. And it can be a bit intimidating when you have got so many other things to do, but there are ways and means of doing it in a time-efficient way that are really, really effective. So for me, it’s always something I’m talking to clubs, leagues, volunteers about, is the quick easier wins, but also looking at it long term about what clubs can do. And I think every single football club from Manchester United to Anchorians to whoever can always do it better because it’s always constantly evolving a bit like Leigh was alluding to. It keeps you on your toes, but it is really important because without it, I think clubs, leagues and other outlets struggle.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, there’s always ways to improve, isn’t there, regardless of the size of your organization and if you work in sport or volunteer in sport, the chances are you are naturally competitive. So it’s interesting that point you raise Leigh around when you started and you’re looking at what the other clubs around you are doing and I suppose it’s ways to make yourself stand out in those of situations, isn’t it?

Leigh Willis:

Yeah. And do you know what Charlotte hit you on the head there. When we started we didn’t have a website. We had a very, very low sort of, well back then, I mean I think the hamster was still going around the wheel, things like that, you know, Facebook, what was that? And the rest of them weren’t even born in terms of the social media platform. But the first thing is raising that awareness, is just literally a really, really basic website. And the difference it made was huge, and that’s exactly the same like Charlotte said, it is today. It’s one of the areas that I’ve certainly pushed not just from my club, but other clubs as well that come to me and ask me questions of how we’ve got as big as we are or how we’ve gone into the female section, how sections grown, what do we do? And it’s just like Charlotte said, the social media and the awareness side is such a big, big part of it now and it’s something that shouldn’t be right down the bottom of the list. It should be near the top.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, absolutely. It is difficult isn’t it when you’re looking at that list of jobs that need doing to try and prioritize it? Charlotte, you mentioned those quick easy wins that clubs can do. What sort of things would you suggest for clubs who are looking for something like that?

Charlotte Richardson:

So I think one of the quick wins would be to get on a scheduling tool. So there are some free platforms out there. Hootsuite is one of them. TweetDeck, Creator Studio is a new professional tool that’s part of Facebook. So if your club has an Instagram account you can embed it with your Facebook, which means that when you’re posting, you could perhaps rather than thinking, oh, I’ve got to do it one hour every single day. You might have a Sunday where you’re at the football club anyway and it’s pouring with rain outside and you can go to the clubhouse, grab yourself a coffee, turn the laptop on and do some scheduling for the month rather than it having to take up all your time in the week. So I think that’s a quick, easy win to help people.

I think also having some metrics because if a football coach sets up their team and obviously the aim is to get three points or to win the football game or in youth football, it might be to make X amount of passes or so on, do the same with yourself. Say, by the end of the year, we would like to try and reach X amount of followers. We’d quite like to get X amount of people visiting our website and then just think about how you’d like to do it because we all give up our time and we all work for that sense of fulfilment. And, that should be the same for the marketing and comms side of it as well. And again, in terms of quick, easy wins with social media, if you’re a youth club in particular, you’ve got this massive network of parents, grandparents, the kids themselves love to feel that recognition and reward.

So even if it’s just perhaps putting some ideas together of a player of the week or volunteer of the week and you can post that and use social media as your means of celebrating it, that could work really effectively as well because we’re all getting communications chucked at us all the time, whether it be via email alerts or so on and actually drawing it back and maybe coming up with quite a simple idea that you can do would be really effective as well. So those are kind of a few quick wins that spring to mind.

Leigh Willis:

And I think with that as well, there should be, depending on the size of your club, but there will always be someone out there who loves to do social media, loves to do that sort of thing, and will be happy to give up a little bit of time just to do that for you rather than again, sharing the load of whacking it on somebody else’s job to do, and sharing it around and creating that role within your club. And again, I’m an advocate of that massively as Charlotte would be, you know to get someone else to do that.

Charlotte Richardson:

Yeah, I’m nodding away furiously there because I think any club or league, we’re all looking for more resources. We’re looking for more people to engage with. And on the flip side of that, I get a lot of students asking me, how do you break into media? How do you break into those marketing roles, those super cool jobs working in digital, you have to accumulate that experience. You have to go out and make mistakes but also do things really, really well. And internships are incredibly competitive. But also when you’re volunteering because you’re a volunteer, you are empowered to have a freedom, and you can build that trust and you can try your own ideas out. And I still believe that that’s how I got my first job in football at the Kent FA, because I had a job interview where I was able to show on a PowerPoint things that I had gone and done as a volunteer.

So from both sides, I think it really works and most football clubs will have that workforce of parents, etc, with children, teenagers, those that are perhaps not employed right now because we’ve got to think of the economic context of all of this as well. A lot of people retired early who will want to be using their skills and sometimes it is just asking and putting a message on WhatsApp or having a quick chat with the mums and dads on the sidelines. Because you never quite know what hidden talent there is or what person could make a real difference.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, utilizing the network in your club is a really good point I think. Like you said about involving the players’ Charlotte in that decision-making because, especially if they’re of a certain age players, they’re probably on social media all the time, even more so than adults are. So they’ll have loads of great creative ideas and they’ll know what people of their age want to see on social media.

Charlotte Richardson:

Yeah, absolutely. We did a bit of, I can’t even think who I was working for at the time, but we gave the camera basically over to the players themselves and they were young players and obviously I say that making sure that you’ve done all your safeguarding and there’s parental consent and stuff like that, but actually it was far more entertaining and the performance of those kind of posts were fantastic. I think Sky Sports even recently did a youth takeover.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah.

Charlotte Richardson:

It was awesome, wasn’t it?

Leigh Willis:

Are you worried for your job now Charlotte? Yeah, it would be interesting to see what feedback they got from that, the alternative commentary that they run. Cause I think they run it over a couple of games and it would’ve been interesting to see what the feedback was like on that.

Charlotte Richardson:

Yeah, probably much, much better than anything I could ever do <laugh>

Natalie Doyle:

And what a great way as well of showing young people what careers are open to them, if they’re interested in working in the industry, that might be something they wouldn’t even consider. So it’s a great way to provide really relatable role models to young people as well, isn’t it?

Charlotte Richardson:

Yeah, it really is. And I think the other point, when you are doing things like this and you are being proactive in raising your profile, another big challenge for clubs and leagues is obviously financially attracting sponsors and so on. And when you are doing things like this that are a little bit different, that are perhaps pioneering and creative, that is going to be really appealing to local businesses and local business people. And that’s another angle of it as well where I’m certain that it’s the last thing chair people want to invest in, but if you are, it can reap its rewards as well. And it’s certainly something that sponsors are keen to see. Why would they sponsor you if they can’t be seen on your website, if they can’t have traffic diverted to them, if they’re getting no mentions or awareness through social media. So I think that’s another really significant angle for people and why they should focus on raising the profile more.

Leigh Willis:

Yeah, I agree with that.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah. It’s a way of making yourself stand out, isn’t it? Leigh, you talked about trying to get somebody to volunteer to do this, to be responsible for this in the club. How does that work in your club? Do you have one person who’s responsible for it or do you have a group of people? How do you manage that?

Leigh Willis:

We started off with having a group of people that did it. I’m not a Facebook fan, sorry guys, I don’t do Facebook and social media very little, but there was quite a few people that did and they sort of all chipped in. The trouble there is you sort of don’t get the continuity across the board. So we were lucky enough that one of our committee members’ wives worked for a charity and did all their social media. So she was quite happy to come on board and do ours. And it’s made a big difference. You can see it across the board now, you know, it’s the views, the likes have gone up a lot more. So yeah, it’s very important. But I think going back to what Charlotte was saying about key wins, I think the key wins for clubs as well, is a simple thing, is their membership forms.

Hopefully, nowadays most clubs have cottoned on that you don’t need to cut down loads and loads of trees to produce reams and reams of paperwork, that you can use online forms and stuff to create your membership form. But within that form, it’s certainly handy to have a column or a question asking what the parent does for a job. And we utilize that quite a bit when we’re targeting specific sort of roles that we want or support that we need. We would look at that membership form and go, ah, yeah, we’ve got a list of 10 here that work in social media, or there’s 10 planners here or there’s 10 this, and it’s really, really handy. And then they can bounce one off against each other and get the best price, but you know it’s a useful tool and again, something that’s simple and easy to do, but a lot of clubs still aren’t at that stage yet thinking about little things like that.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, that’s a great suggestion, isn’t it? Because that doesn’t just apply obviously for this particular subject that we’re talking about today, that’s for all sorts of volunteering roles. And how many times do you stand at the side of a pitch watching your kid do some sort of activity, you’re chatting to the person next to them and you might chat to them every week, but you’ve no idea what they do as a job. So it’s getting, I think Charlotte, you mentioned it earlier about getting to know the parents and getting to understand a little bit more about what their background is and what their experiences are.

Charlotte Richardson:

Yeah. And don’t be afraid to ask. I was working with a club who are at the beginning of a really exciting capital project, building a new clubhouse and needed quotes and needed to show X, Y, and Z and we quite simply put something on the website with the drawings and the proposals and said, this is what we need, would you like to quote for the business? Because there is that idea as well of adding value to those that are members or stakeholders within your club or league. But also, like Leigh alluded to, you’ve got that stakeholder who’s got a vested interest in your football club, so negotiations can be slightly different. Can you get a better price? Could they do a sponsorship? Which means that you can save a bit of money, build a long-term strategic partnership and that is just a really simple way, just ask. Put an email out there, say you are looking for X, Y or Z. A part of your facility could be falling apart, and I, I know now, it is something that the FA is really hot on in terms of raising standards and it might be this stark figure that you are presented from another company will ask people, use social media, use that power of your network. but that network’s not going to be there if you don’t try and raise your profile on a consistent basis.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, definitely. There’s an interesting point about utilizing the website there because Leigh, you mentioned that when you started off, the website was the first thing that you did as a club as well. What are the important things that clubs need to consider when it comes to their website to make sure that they’re working as well for them as they possibly can?

Leigh Willis:

I think you’ve got to make it as interactive and user-friendly as possible. Making sure the interface is simple to use. It’s not too complicated. Not making it too clunky. You’ve got vital information on there, which is basic stuff about what sessions you run in what age groups you run to but also making it warm and friendly, and very simple. Again, there’s hundreds of websites out there, website providers that you could use and different things, and they’ve each got their own benefits and weaknesses, it’s just finding the right model that works for you, whether you want something bespoke that you could just do yourself. 

Again, touching base with the stakeholders in your club, you might find there’s web designers or something else in there that can do your own bespoke one or you go for something that’s already there. You might have a few adverts on it and stuff like that that you don’t like, but it’s for ease. It’s there, it’s usable, it’s done. But just keeping up to date with, for us anyway, and from the websites I’ve run, it’s just keeping up to date with the latest news, making sure that you are raising awareness of the good stuff that you’ve done and the sessions that you’re offering.

Charlotte Richardson:

<laugh> 10 out of 10 answer. I completely agree. I think one good tester of use, whether it’s user-friendly or not, it’s a piece of advice I give clubs, is set maybe three different scenarios up. You’re trying to find fixtures or you want to know how to sponsor the club or you would like to apply to become a volunteer and then test how many clicks is required to find that information out. Because you should never really have to click more than three times. That’s always a good testing point to know whether your website is effective or not. If someone is having to click more than three times to find out something like that, then you need to have a little look at your structure. You need to take a little bit of a look back and be a bit critical and maybe reduce information and so on. So again, it’s a good little thing for anyone listening to go away and do is do the kind of three-click test on their own website.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, that’s a great tip. I think it’s also, it’s trying to make sure that everything is kept up to date, isn’t it? Like I’ve lost count of the amount of times that you see details of a session that’s meant to be happening at this time at this place and then when you get there, it’s actually not taking place. So making sure that all your information is accurate and up to date.

Charlotte Richardson:

Yeah, definitely. And I think that again comes to just a bit of planning of maybe pencilling in half an hour at the start of every month or every week because it does in turn capture how professional you are. And I know I’m saying this when we are talking a lot about grassroots football, but some of the big clubs out there like leagues, they do have to exude professionalism. They have to be running a professional way because of the number of people they’re providing football for. And also because I think anyone that wants to get involved wants to be the best that they can be. And there’s nothing worse than going on a website and, we are recording this in January, but say seeing something about sessions in October, stuff about Christmas still.

I do think it gives a cross sense of is this club organised? Is it the best fit for my child. On the flip reverse I might say be, you know, an over 30 who’s watched some super league football at the weekend and wants to pick up my boots and start playing again. But I’m very nervous about doing so, like Leigh says, I want to see a website that has got it, it’s not only informative but that is warm and inviting. So your tone of voice is really important. Don’t just do a copy and paste or be super formal if that’s not the vibe of your football club. And I suspect for most people that’s not the vibe of their football club. So I think that’s really important as well.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah. So what does your website say about your club, isn’t it? What sort of impression does it give and if that’s the first impression that people are going to get, are you happy with that impression it’s giving out to people?

Charlotte Richardson:

Exactly.

Leigh Willis:

Yeah. It’s got to be engaging.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, definitely. Okay. So thinking about the clubs either that you’re involved in now or organizations you’re involved in now or have been previously, what examples have you seen that clubs and organizations have done to raise their profile? What’s worked well that you’ve seen in the past?

Charlotte Richardson:

I think speaking maybe at Bromley it was and always has been very embedded in that football club about getting out in the community. Not just expecting people to come to Hayes Lane, which is the stadium that they play at. The mountain won’t come to Mohammed or whatever the saying is, sometimes you have to move out there and I appreciate, I’m saying this with an example of a football club that is a professional outlet, but what they did wasn’t just for the men’s team, it was for the whole women’s youth. They built a really strong rapport with their local shopping centre and the mascot would go around quite frequently, and they were taught some discussions about utilizing space within there and I think that kind of consistency of getting out in the community was really effective for them because obviously they wanted to get more visitors down to their clubhouse.

But I think whatever your target is, whether it’s promoting a new football team or whatever, home is where the heart is. Don’t worry always about digital. Actually get out physically into the local community, whether it be your local radio or local newspaper as well. I think there’s that two-way thing. Local is a thing that’s come out of the pandemic I think a bit more. People really care about what’s on their doorstep. So there’s probably opportunities to get involved there, whether it be a shopping centre or local library or newspaper or so on. Like think what’s on your doorstep and utilize that.

Leigh Willis:

Yeah, I think that’s a really good point. I’m just trying to think across all the years and the grey hairs will show that of how long I’ve been here going back, trying to think of all the clubs. But certainly from a league point of view they have done some really good stuff. And I think that is it. Also hosting events, organize something at your grounds that people want to come to, whether it be open days and some of these clubs have got sports clubs, where it’s not just football that’s there, there’s other sports they’ve got there. So let them come along, and try these other sports as well. Ultimately we want people to get active and get out there and get away from their PlayStation, Xbox and be a bit more active than they are at the moment, I think as well it is that, again, I said it before, synergy. It’s making sure that you perhaps come across and certain clubs do it really, it’s one club.

It’s not all about the first team. The lesser team doesn’t get forgotten about. It is having that welcoming family environment and certainly, if you’re in the grassroots level and that’s where you aspire to be, you need to protect that. It does get very lost at times I think where the first team, it’s all about them and that’s it, everything else gets a little bit lost, which is a shame especially when they’re only at that grassroots level. And work with local authorities, I think that’s another key thing as well, which again, unfortunately not all local authorities are as engaging as some as we would know over the years, but when they do engage, they want you to be part of it. 

They want to support their local events and vice versa as well. So I think again, that’s a really good way to engage with your community and raise your profile of your club which hopefully will then benefit in terms of increased membership and providing more opportunities.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, it’s really interesting, how you’ve both raised points there around the importance of building those relationships with your local communities and it’s interesting how we’ve focused a lot of our initial discussions around online social media and websites, but then also when it comes to you raising points of things that you’ve seen work really well, it’s getting out and meeting people and talking to people and that can make a real difference. That’s still the best way to build relationships is face-to-face with people.

Charlotte Richardson:

I think word of mouth is always the best marketing tool. So it’s why you try and get those foundations right by having a good website, by having accurate information, by having a nice tone of voice to your digital channels and so on. But then there’s no good having all of that and then if someone actually turns up to your football club, they’re greeted with miserable, unhappy people.

Natalie Doyle:

A bad experience. Yeah.

Charlotte Richardson:

Poor experience and yeah, ultimately being active and proactive it’s always going to reap the reward. You know, you’ve sewn the seeds but you’ve got to go out and water them and that’s why sometimes it’s really essential that you put the laptop down, that you get out there, you get talking, you think about, well what is the most effective means of doing this? And sometimes that is simply putting yourself in the shoes of the parent, the player, the coach, the referee, whoever it is, and working backwards that way. So I think it’s essential not to get too consumed in that digital world. Whereas I said earlier, it feels like you’ve got a lot coming at you all the time. I love when, and not many brands do it, there is cost attached, but if a brand sends me something in the post, I’m so much more inclined to have a read of it, to have a flick through because that is so rare now. Whereas before that was the only way to do it and you’d get fed up. So I think there’s a really nice balance to be had there and people will know their club and league best, but don’t think that you know best all the time. Get out there, get talking, market research, every conversation you have can count as market research so that you are making really good decisions.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah. It’s finding that balance between the two worlds, isn’t it?

Leigh Willis:

Yeah. Certainly much better these days, like you said, I think it’s almost gone full circle where we were inundated with text and emails and now it’s, people actually like something physical in their hands again now. So it’s knowing your market, knowing who you’re engaging with and how’s the best way to reach them.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, definitely. Right. We’re starting to run out of time, so I’m going to use my last few minutes to pick the last bits of pearls of wisdom out of your brains. If you had a club who wanted to raise their profile, what would be your top tip that you would give them?

Leigh Willis:

For me, I think I would say have a holistic, realistic approach to, that was a bit of a tongue twister, wasn’t it? Have a realistic look at yourselves and put your five strengths and your five weaknesses, but be realistic and then look to see where they meet, where you could go and, where you could actually improve and develop yourself. But making sure you’re aligned to whatever your club ID is or what your strategy is as well and making sure you’re working towards that and then formalize a plan from that really.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah, like taking your time to think about what you’re going to do before you just jump straight into the action.

Leigh Willis:

Yeah. Yeah.

Natalie Doyle:

How about you Charlotte?

Charlotte Richardson:

For me, I think it’s really hard because there are so many different things you can do and it’s different dependent on where your club is at or your league is at. But I think in terms of a universal thing that everyone can do, it’s to have a little think about what platform do you really want to work for you in 2023. I think there is this expectation sometimes to be on everything, social media, website, newspaper. Just maybe focus on one and really pay attention and plan some stuff on that particular channel or that particular platform. I actually really want to get us in our local newspaper. I really want to make sure that we are promoting that. So each week they might send something to that local newspaper, the under eights result or the men’s teams result or whatever to just generate positive PR. It could be Facebook is going to be our platform and I’m going to really put some time into it, but don’t feel like you have to do everything. Just focus on the platforms that serve you best.

Natalie Doyle:

Yeah. That’s really good advice. Oh, I’ve got some really good tips in this episode. Thank you both so much for giving up your time. It’s been great to hear about your experiences and hear about your great advice and tips that you’ve got for clubs out there. I think there’s a lot of stuff that people can take away, so thank you very much for giving up the time.

Charlotte Richardson:

You’re very, very welcome. Thanks for having me on.

Natalie Doyle:

Well that was great to talk to Charlotte and Leigh, I really enjoyed our conversation. They’re very easy to talk to, which always helps. There’s some really good advice there as well. Lots of great quick, easy wins that you can implement, but also talking about the importance of utilizing your network and developing links with your local community and the priorities around making sure you’re finding the right people to do these jobs when you keep getting added more and more things onto your list. I hope that you found it useful and interesting. We’re going to be back again soon for another episode with some other fantastic guests to talk about some more key topics for grassroots sport. So we’ll see you then.

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